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Le joli mai (Chris Marker, 1963) 

showslow:

Chinese Couple Takes Wedding Photos in Gas Masks to Protest Beijing Pollution | Via Daily Mail UK / Image credits: HAP/Quirky China News/REX

Your wedding day is a testament of hope and commitment to the future. This clever Chinese couple decided to use their wedding day to make another testament, too. They donned gas masks for their wedding day to illustrate the horrible state of pollution in Beijing and throughout China. The images are both creatively memorable and an eerie statement against air pollution. Pollution in Beijing has reached high enough proportions that citizens must wear paper masks to avoid breathing in particles that can enter their bloodstream.

This couple’s bold move is a powerful statement to China and the world that pollution needs to be stopped to have the futures we all dream of. Hopefully this couple does not become victim of oppression now that they used their creativity to showcase China’s problems to the world.

oinonio:

Over the past century, we’ve come to regard parking as a basic public good that should be freely shared — partly because of the sheer historical accident that parking meters didn’t come along until the 1930s, a few decades after the car.

"By then, the custom of free parking was well-established," Shoup says. "It’s hard to start charging people for something that the government owns and had been free." Consequently, parking is still free, he calculates, for 99 percent of all car trips made in the country.

But a parking spot, unlike things we normally consider to be public goods, is finite. It can only be used by a one car at a time. So if we let the market set the price, in cities, it’d certainly go above zero — and there’s not really any compelling reason why it alone should be kept free. “We pay for everything else about our cars — the car itself, the gas, the tires, the insurance,” Shoup says. “Why is it that parking should be different?”

Read On: Why free parking is bad for everyone - Vox

oinonio:

Over the past century, we’ve come to regard parking as a basic public good that should be freely shared — partly because of the sheer historical accident that parking meters didn’t come along until the 1930s, a few decades after the car.

"By then, the custom of free parking was well-established," Shoup says. "It’s hard to start charging people for something that the government owns and had been free." Consequently, parking is still free, he calculates, for 99 percent of all car trips made in the country.

But a parking spot, unlike things we normally consider to be public goods, is finite. It can only be used by a one car at a time. So if we let the market set the price, in cities, it’d certainly go above zero — and there’s not really any compelling reason why it alone should be kept free. “We pay for everything else about our cars — the car itself, the gas, the tires, the insurance,” Shoup says. “Why is it that parking should be different?”

Read On: Why free parking is bad for everyone - Vox

econsociology:

Theory in Pictures: Consumption / Demand in Economics

econsociology:

Theory in Pictures: Consumption / Demand in Economics

lunarobverse:

A brilliant metaphor

…no one has discovered the art of catching fish in waters that contain none.
Karl Marx - Capital Vol 1 1867 (via dailymarx)